Two-son Christology

A man has two sons. 一個人有兩個兒子
--this is an ancient rabbinic pattern to begin a parallel that’s about feud, preference, wisdom, reconciliation, peace, and unity.
You’ll see that since the patriarchal lineages of Cain & Abel, Esau & Jacob, Isaac & Ishmael, and David & Jonathan could be included in this vein too (Saul being their father-king). the key insight of this for interpreting Jesus is not merely about discerning the many parables he told in this gospels with this same narrative pattern, but more so about « how his person is the embodiment and consummation of this two-sons tale. »
Namely, the divine & the mortal, one elected & one reprobate (to the father), one that’s dwelling at home & one that’s journeying far away, one’s directly begotten & one’s contingently born, and one who is in perfect unity with the other.
this insight into the Christological character is somehow dropped as the Greek emphasis on the divine got the preponderance over the Latin formulation of the Christological confession, thereby forbidding later Christians to probe deep into the more ontic aspects of rabbinic metaphors,
Whereas the Jewish Jews too fail to see how Jesus is not just fulfilling the role of being a good rabbi but also the « signified » of the rabbi- his PERSON signifies the desired outcome/perlocution of the two-sons tale.

Kenneth Bailey wrote a poem in October 1973 called “Resurrection”.  It is subtitled “Ode on a Burning Tank: The Holy Lands”.

“A certain man had two sons.
One was rich and the other was poor.
The rich son had no children
while the poor son was blessed
with many sons and many daughters.

In time the father fell ill.
He was sure he would not live through the week
so on Saturday he called his sons to his side
and gave each of them half of the land of their inheritance.
Then he died.
Before sundown the sons buried their father with respect
as custom requires.

That night the rich son could not sleep.
He said to himself,
‘What my father did was not just.
I am rich, my brother is poor.
I have bread enough and to spare,
while my brother’s children eat one day
and trust God for the next.
I must move the landmark which our father has set in the middle of the land
so that my brother will have the greater share.

Ah – but he must not see me.
If he sees me he will be shamed.
I must arise early in the morning before it is dawn
and move the landmark!’
With this he fell asleep
and his sleep was secure and peaceful.

Meanwhile, the poor brother could not sleep.
As he lay restless on his bed he said to himself,
‘What my father did was not just.
Here I am surrounded by the joy of many sons and many daughters,
while my brother daily faces the shame
of having no sons to carry on his name
and no daughters to comfort him in his old age.
He should have the land of our fathers.
Perhaps this will in part compensate him
for his indescribable poverty.

Ah – but if I give it to him he will be shamed.
I must awake early in the morning before it is dawn
and move the landmark which our father has set!’
With this he went to sleep
and his sleep was secure and peaceful.

On the first day of the week –
very early in the morning,
a long time before it was day,
the two brothers met at the ancient landmarker.

They fell with tears into each other’s arms.
And on the spot was built the city of Jerusalem.”

Publicités

Une réflexion sur « Two-son Christology »

Poster un commentaire 我有話說

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s